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2011workerbeeandhiveAmerican artist Judi Harvest works with Murano glass and wire to delicately construct her hive sculptures that mimic nature in the most incredibly surreal transformation. These gorgeous works vary in intricacy, but each one displays in inordinate amount of skill in glassworking – one of the trickiest mediums to master.

Each vessel begins with a hand-rolled cylinder of chicken wire, wire found in Venice and characterized by a finer module than that of the hive sculptures made in New York. Glass is blown into the cylinder, protrudes between the wires, and balloons delicately above the top. Some vessels retain wire embedded in their surfaces. Amber glass is the base color in which Harvest mixes gold or silver leaf and other additives that affect opacity, reflectivity, and hue. Sprinkling the hot surface with powdered glass pigment and reinserting the vessel into the furnace creates a rough yet dainty texture that resembles a dusting of pollen. (Denatured: Honeybees + Murano catalogue, Venice, 2013)

Aside from her art, her love of beekeeping fuels her inspiration – the complicated structures and buzzing activity of the hives drives her to create these amazing pieces. A truly talented and interesting individual to say the least.

To find out more about her and see more of these awesome creations, check out her website.

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11-ines-kozic-yatzerI am ever enamoured of the beautiful photography of French artist Inez Kozic. She delicately constructs incredible images that both convey a sense of serene beauty and inarticulate horror. Playfully decorating her subjects with hair, bone, and insects, she transforms even the most mundane of domestic chores into scenes of breathtaking exquisiteness and understated passion. The unique dream-like way she portrays her subjects adds to the quality of solitude and quiet reflection that these photographs already inherently possess, creating visual poetry.

To check out more of her work, check out her website.

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ImageThere’s something to be said for obsession in the world of art. It’s what drives us to collect, cohere, and create. For Markham, Ontario native Ellen Jewett, her obsession with creating sculptural forms at a young age, and her love of biology are what propelled her into the wonderously surreal world of expressive sculpture that she thrives in today. Having studied Biological Anthropology and Fine Art at McMaster University, she took her education as the groundwork to spring her forward into full time studio work almost immediately after graduating with honours, and continues to expand her knowledge with apprenticeships, additional professional classes, as well as teaching at various levels.

For Jewett, according to her website bio, sculpting is all about the idea of life itself, and the subtleties of the nature of biology; it’s narratives, movement, balance, and emotions. There is no limitation to the medium in which she works – she bends the laws of nature to create her vision rather than be constrained by her materials. Her works are grotesque, and surreal, evoking the essence of the abstraction of biology and nature while effortlessly floating in an otherworldly ambiance.

Personally, the Slum Fox is my favourite. The expressive nature in which she constructs the forms and works with light and shadow is beyond compare. The details are so intricately crafted, and lend such a whimsical and fantastic quality – right down to the little clotheslines… they absolutely kill me. I wish this piece was still available because I would have bought it up in a heartbeat.

Check out more of her amazing pieces on her website.

Buy from her Etsy shop.

Check out her Deviant Art gallery.

Keep up to date on exhibitions on her blog.

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ImageThese three dimensional hyperrealistic sculptures of sea creatures by Keng Lye are mind-blowing. The Singapore-based artist uses acrylics and epoxy resin to render these incredible works of art by first pouring resin into a receptacle, then meticulously painting a layer of acrylic over it, and adding another layer of resin, building up layer after layer until the forms emerge. Much like the process of how a 3-D printer functions, each slice reveals more about the animals he creates, creating this amazing illusion of structural depth.

So are they paintings or are they sculptures, one asks. I guess they could be classified as both. The technique was originally used by a Japanese artist named Riusuke Fukahori, who focuses his creative energies on three dimensional goldfish. In his series “Alive Without Breath”, Lye takes the process an extra step by having the creatures emerge from the surface, creating a greater sense of dynamic perspective. To achieve this, he adds physical pieces that he paints to match the layers below.

I started my first series in 2012 where all the illustrations were “flat” and depth was created using the layering of resin and acrylic over the different parts of the illustration. This year, I started on the octopus and it was purely an experiment; I just wanted to see whether I could push this technique to a higher level. After applying acrylic paint straight onto the resin, I incorporated a 3-D element in this instance, it was a small pebble for the ranchu and octopus. For the turtle, I used an egg shell for the turtle shell and acrylic paint for the rest of the finishing. The whole idea here was to give the art work an even more 3D effect therefore you can have a better view from any angle. I think there are still many other techniques to explore.”

To check out more of his work, visit his gallery.

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Brooklyn-based artist Anthony Lister and I share a common view – that the “heroes” that are presented through the media, that surround us at every step, are often misguided, and less glamorous than we perceive them to be. As someone who’s worked behind the scenes in television and film for many years, I know this one all too well and can relate to his ennui, but I do love how he interprets this world through his art.

With his art, Lister splashes this message anywhere he can – any way he can, using stickers, markers, and aerosol paint, drawing from his past experiences growing up in Brisbane, Australia, his travels around the world, and his life as a husband and father of two. His subject matter usually revolves around the pop culture icons that have populated his sphere – skateboarding, comic book superheroes, tattoos, television, graffiti, pop culture, advertising, jail birds, the internet and Aussie celebrity gangsters.

He’s also shown his work around the globe in exhibitions both in museums and on the streets, all over Australia, the U.S., the U.K. and Europe. He’s been featured on many art-related websites such as Juxtapoz.com, FecalFace.com and WoosterCollective.com. And something tells me this is just the beginning…

Check out more of his awesome work on his website.

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