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SzSz

I guess this illustration by SzSz pretty much sums up how I’m feeling this week. Work has been blowing into our office like a crazy tornado and I’ve been trying to keep on top of it, but that often gets tricky in the world of design. I’m not looking forward to my coworker going on vacation soon, that’s for sure.

In the meantime, I haven’t been able to do much trolling the web for inspiration, but this morning I forced myself to take a break and peruse a few sites, one of which caught my attention. Shadowness is a growing online art community much like DeviantArt where people can post their work. In particular, I was very much impressed with some people’s talent when it comes to creating vector and vexel art, so I thought I’d share a few of the more amusing ones that I came across.

If you want to check out more, visit the Shadowness website.

Enjoy!

SzSz

IsaPanicMonsta

IsaPanicMonsta

IsaPanicMonsta

ika

ika

brads

brads

brads

SILO

SILO

SILO

gene 12

gene 12

gene 12

gemzki002

exoesqueletodv

exoesqueletodv

exoesqueletodv

kepalakardus

kepalakardus

kepalakardus

nofartherapy

nofartherapy

wilmurmurillo

Deftbeat

Deftbeat

oucho

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Portugese artist Paulo Arraiano (aka Yup), is a well-known illustrator and magazine Art Director (Slang Magazine, Magnolia Magazine), who has dabbled in several other mediums and has accumulated quite a huge portfolio of work over the years, that includes street art, a clothing line (Palm urban wear), vinyl toys (Speakerdog toy for fellow Infectious artist Ben The Illustrator), CD packaging and iPhone cases, and even a teaching position at the Restart School of Creativity and New Technologies in Lisbon. Whatever medium he chooses, his intuitively distinctive style cascades throughout most of his work, which he amusingly describes as “supafreakyfunny creatures from distant worlds and realities who are invited to be placed in all mediums possible, from digital to walls, clothing, street, toys, skateboards, music, galleries…”. In short, he crosses all platforms and transcends all avenues of articulation with his modes of self-expression.

His art poses many working contradictions – mirroring dualities that exist all around us, such as the one between nature and the urban landscape, as well as the natural vs. the artificial, and he manages to strike a balance between the two. His message is one of exploding positivity, and a celebration of life and evolution. His whole life has been dedicated to the pursuit of artistic expression, having grown up riding skateboards and being influenced by the aggressive, often rebellious spontaneity of urban culture. Juxtapose this with his love of the harmonious fluidity of surfing and Jamaican rhythms, and you have a perfect symbiosis that forms the basis of his creativity. Yup is endlessly pushing towards an evolution of energy, symbiosis, and motion – searching for the ultimate balance between the primitive, simplicity of nature and the complex, artificial, and abstract urban world – to get to the root of all that is.

Yup’s got so many projects and clients under his belt, there’s just not enough hours in the day to talk about them all. Instead, check out more of his stuff on his website.

 

Wow! Can’t believe I’ve gotten to 100 posts already! Time sure flies!

Belgian artist Philip Bosmans’ sketchbook must be an awesome sight to behold – apparently he doesn’t go too far without it, since all of his ideas, inspiration and ideas get crammed into it to avoid them slipping off into oblivion. I wouldn’t mind taking a peek some day.

Bosmans is also known on the streets as “amatic”. He was classically trained as a graphic designer but he’s a self-taught painter and graf artist with a real penchant for the surrealistic qualities of fantasy worlds beyond our own. From his sketchbooks springs forth a bountiful array of organic shapes and colours, strange distorted characters and twisted subject matter. It is not only an escape from the real world, it is an in-depth look at the spectrum of human emotion that is characterized in a dream-like state. I love the way he juxtaposes moods such as overlapping happiness with grief.

He’s also great with digital art as he is on canvas or concrete, constructing seemingly endless numbers of logotypes, and has won numerous awards, most notably the uber-prestigious Macworld UK Digital Artist of the Year Award 2011 for his work entitled “Origins of the Species”.

Currently, Bosmans is being represented by the ARTISHOX Art Agency. Check out his website, and his blog.

Chinese culture has always showcased a strong cultural legacy in the graphic arts, producing some of the world’s most talented artists and juxtaposing the ancient traditions with cutting edge concepts. Shanghai-based illustrator Shan Jiang lives and breathes these very ideologies through his creations which portray a strong sense of the contemporary against the rigid structure of traditional Asian techniques.

His work clearly illustrates the contradiction between rooting himself deeply in the often delicate and sensitive lines of beautifully detailed images in contrast with the strong basic abstract and somewhat surreal qualities of stylized modern graphics. His inspiration is often comprised of the environment that surrounds him – the evolution of a society that is two-sided, a world inhabited by skyscrapers and bungalows, ancient superstitions, expanding subcultures and communist dogma.

Currently Shan Jiang works for ILoveDust, based out of South England (from his home in Beijing), and has started up his own company, Bad Image. His extensive client list includes corporate giants such as Miller Beer, Starbucks, Nike, Levi’s, Coca Cola, and many others, but he’s very versatile and also likes to dabble in independent projects such as children’s books.

See more of Shan Jiang’s work on his beautiful website.

Ian Sklarsky is a Chicago-born, Brooklyn-based artist who’s been creating amazing abstract portraits – over 700 in the past five years alone – illustrating everything from people to pets using only pen, ink, and a splash of water colour.

The 30-year-old became engrossed in the traditional blind contour method of drawing when he learned about it in a high school art class – the artist must trace the outline of the subject in one line, without looking at the paper or canvas, creating a very expressive and abstract result. Sklarsky has to put himself in the right mindset to allow his hand to guide him across the page, keeping absolutely zen throughout the process – which can sometimes be no easy feat, as when he works on large format portraits, such as group illustrations that tower over six feet high.

Sklarsky’s portraits often begin around $65 and go up from there, depending on the size and complexity as well as the time to complete each one. They are all signed and sealed with wax, and he also offers an epoxy glaze option to those who want it, which tends to cause the paper to become somewhat translucent so you can back-light it for emphasis in your decor.

To see more, obtain a commissioned piece, and find out when and where he is appearing next, check out Sklarsky’s website. He is also on Tumblr, so be sure to visit often to see the progress of his work. Cool Hunting also recently posted a video of Sklarsky working on one of his portraits – you can view it here.

French artist Francoise Nielly is a widely-publicized photographer and illustrator, best known for her beautiful neon portraits. Her fantastic use of colour in her oil paintings is vibrant and electric, seeming to breathe life with bold, dynamic strokes. 


Check out more of her amazing portraits and photographs here


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