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Lisbon-based urban “scrapffiti” artist Bordalo II is a master of creating compelling work from the refuse of the streets that surround him. Using a myriad of media to express his ideas, he interprets the city landscape in a whirlwind of assemblage that is as deeply rooted in chaos as it is in harmony and balance with the world around him. Not only is he recycling the trash around him, he is also providing commentary on his perception of how we live. He believes that though we have beautiful objects, they are often based on garbage, and we never really perceive that aspect.

His talent grew from a love of learning from his grandfather, who was a prolific Portugese painter, most known for his depictions of the streets of Lisbon. Having absorbed so much from his elder, he has evolved into a more modern version of his legacy. And he still has lots of time to grow…

Check out his website to see more amazing work. [Note: it still might be under construction]

“Like” him on Facebook and see his progress. He’s got lots of cool stuff posted all the time.

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American artist Chris Cooksey creates some of the most intricate and imaginative sculptures using children’s toys, dolls, and found objects. These amazing compositions are rife with drama and mystery and remind me of the work of H.R. Giger and Hieronymous Bosch. The masterful industrial Rococo-inspired collage quality gives you a sense of living in a harsh and cruel environment, each element, whether human or mechanical, providing an important part to the overall whole.

I admire his patience with working in such detail and the scrutiny involved in every element. Both eccentric and utterly erratic, they convey a sense of darkness and beauty that live deep within the human soul.  

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Artist and musician Ben Giles has a penchant for vintage printed ephemera and uses elements to create his delightfully quirky collages in an often humorous way. He’s quickly becoming popular and his prints can be found on Society 6 and Etsy.

To see more of Giles’ work, visit his website.

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