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Pyroclastic Flow: Art & Design Inspiration

mini-subwayz-511-03
Can’t get enough throwin up on trains? Or mini graffiti supplies? France’s All City stores have got an innovative product that takes the train yard back to your desk at home – the Mini Subwayz! Packed flat so as to ensure an easier time of writing, these miniature subway cars are the most economical and hassle-free way to get your burner up in full colour without the bullshit of having to hop fences, get grimey, or avoid the third rail.

Compatible with most paint marker brands like Posca or the OTR.165 and OTR.265, their study construction is comprised of a rigid and varnished cardboard. That makes them easier to manipulate and decorate, as well as more environmentally friendly than plastic or metal. There are several popular styles to choose from, drawing inspiration from major cities around the globe: New York, Paris, Berlin, Hamburg, and even a little delivery truck straight out of the Belleville market!

To buy, visit any All City shop in France, or go to their online shop. They still have the Berlin and New York cars available, but will hopefully get more stock soon as they gain popularity!

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walltowall511Quite possibly the most adorable thing Montana Colors has ever come up with – the mini wall. Ideal for perfecting your skills as a graffiti artist. Wall2Wall is a project by Oscar Clemente, esclusively for Montana Colors.

Find out more about it on the Montana World website

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APES, Barcelona

APES, Barcelona

HASK, Barcelona

HASK, Barcelona

PAKO, Barcelona

PAKO, Barcelona

PUKE, Barcelona

PUKE, Barcelona

SENDYS, Barcelona

SENDYS, Barcelona

Juxtapozmisterfinch07Is there anything more visually stunning and supremely tactile than the gorgeous stuffed creatures of self-taught Leeds textile artist Mister Finch? His sculptures are so incredibly charming and sophisticated in character I just want to reach out and give them a squeeze. (Wouldn’t mind giving this beautiful gent a squeeze myself!)

Collecting textiles from all over and combining them with scraps of scattered, lost and unwanted objects and mediums, he hand stitches elements of the forgotten and discarded and breathes new life into them in his own fantastical way. Their antique qualities evoke the ancient world of fairy-tales and the mysterious otherworldly stuff of dreams, as he weaves and stitches their stories together.

To find out more about this incredibly lovely man, and see what he’s creating next, visit his beautiful websiteJuxtapozmisterfinch00 Juxtapozmisterfinch01 Juxtapozmisterfinch02 Juxtapozmisterfinch03 Juxtapozmisterfinch04 Juxtapozmisterfinch05 Juxtapozmisterfinch06 Juxtapozmisterfinch09 Juxtapozmisterfinch11 Juxtapozmisterfinch12 Juxtapozmisterfinch13 Juxtapozmisterfinch15 Juxtapozmisterfinch16 Juxtapozmisterfinch18 Juxtapozmisterfinch19 Juxtapozmisterfinch20

e1Born in Paris in 1975, Eva Jospin has created a unique way of bringing the life cycle of cardboard around full circle by turning back into the forest from whence it came – or at least, a representation of it. Reinventing the very nature of what makes a forest, she deconstructs the man-made and re-assembles it back into its original form.

Ripping and cutting through piles and piles of cardboard, layering it expertly in arrangements to create bas relief and even 3-dimensional shapes, her pieces grow a renewed life of their own and become a metaphor for exploration of self and expression of the internal journey of human existence. The juxtaposition of working with sturdy raw materials against the fragility and impermanence of nature itself is what lends a profound meaning to her work. We are so connected to nature as humans living on this earth, and yet there is a major disparity and disconnect that we are constantly trying to overcome.

I’d love to see a giant installation of Jospin’s forest and get lost in it, wouldn’t you?

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Bar, 2009

Bar, 2009

American artist and photographer Lori Nix shares a common fascination with me – the seemingly impending post-apocalyptic world, which is why I’m so immediately attracted to her work. She constructs these incredible dioramas and expertly lights and photographs them so as to appear almost hyperreal. Combining her love of landscape art with the childhood memories of living in disaster-prone Kansas, she posits a foreseeable future in her “doomsday dollhouse” photographs.

In my newest body of work “The City” I have imagined a city of our future, where something either natural or as the result of mankind, has emptied the city of it’s human inhabitants. Art museums, Broadway theaters, laundromats and bars no longer function. The walls are deteriorating, the ceilings are falling in, the structures barely stand, yet Mother Nature is slowly taking them over. These spaces are filled with flora, fauna and insects, reclaiming what was theirs before man’s encroachment. I am afraid of what the future holds if we do not change our ways regarding the climate, but at the same time I am fascinated by what a changing world can bring.  – Lori Nix, via her website

The end of civilization as we know it is a mesmerizing inevitability that we as humans, are naturally drawn to, so why not continuing to explore this conceptual world without humanity in various art forms? Like our dreams when we sleep, it helps us to further connect with the idea of our own mortality as a species, and reflect on what we’ve done to this planet, and how it will continue to thrive without us in the end. We are but a twinkle in the eye of the storm.

To find out more about Lori Nix and see her work, check out her website.

Casino, 2013

Casino, 2013

Library, 2007

Library, 2007

Chinese Take-Out, 2013

Chinese Take-Out, 2013

Subway, 2012

Subway, 2012

Beauty Shop, 2010

Beauty Shop, 2010

Mall, 2010

Mall, 2010

Circulation Desk, 2012

Circulation Desk, 2012

Fountain, 2008

Fountain, 2008

Laundromat at Night, 2008

Laundromat at Night, 2008

Great Hall, 2006

Great Hall, 2006

 

2011workerbeeandhiveAmerican artist Judi Harvest works with Murano glass and wire to delicately construct her hive sculptures that mimic nature in the most incredibly surreal transformation. These gorgeous works vary in intricacy, but each one displays in inordinate amount of skill in glassworking – one of the trickiest mediums to master.

Each vessel begins with a hand-rolled cylinder of chicken wire, wire found in Venice and characterized by a finer module than that of the hive sculptures made in New York. Glass is blown into the cylinder, protrudes between the wires, and balloons delicately above the top. Some vessels retain wire embedded in their surfaces. Amber glass is the base color in which Harvest mixes gold or silver leaf and other additives that affect opacity, reflectivity, and hue. Sprinkling the hot surface with powdered glass pigment and reinserting the vessel into the furnace creates a rough yet dainty texture that resembles a dusting of pollen. (Denatured: Honeybees + Murano catalogue, Venice, 2013)

Aside from her art, her love of beekeeping fuels her inspiration – the complicated structures and buzzing activity of the hives drives her to create these amazing pieces. A truly talented and interesting individual to say the least.

To find out more about her and see more of these awesome creations, check out her website.

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11-ines-kozic-yatzerI am ever enamoured of the beautiful photography of French artist Inez Kozic. She delicately constructs incredible images that both convey a sense of serene beauty and inarticulate horror. Playfully decorating her subjects with hair, bone, and insects, she transforms even the most mundane of domestic chores into scenes of breathtaking exquisiteness and understated passion. The unique dream-like way she portrays her subjects adds to the quality of solitude and quiet reflection that these photographs already inherently possess, creating visual poetry.

To check out more of her work, check out her website.

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